Open Source PowerShell Core on Linux and Mac

Target Audience:

Systems administrators that manage multi-platform systems, Linux, Windows and Mac

Abstract:

PowerShell is now available on Linux and Mac, and you want to use it to manage your multi-platform data center. In this session, we will introduce Open Source version, PowerShell Core and learn why this is a big deal.

Then we’ll get into the essentials of using PowerShell on Linux and Mac. We’ll start with installation, work our way into using cmdlets and bash integration, building pipelines, heterogenous operating system remoting scenarios and discuss Desired State Configuration.

In this session we’ll cover the following

  • Installing PowerShell on Linux
  • Finding Help
  • Working with cmdlets and bash integration
  • Comparing the PowerShell pipeline and a UNIX style text-based pipeline
  • Remoting across different platforms
  • Desired State Configuration

Why I Want to Present This Session:

Microsoft has embraced the Open Source community, so let’s learn how to manage multi-platform systems with PowerShell Core

Additional Resources:

http://www.centinosystems.com/blog/

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Meet Anthony Nocentino, Enterprise Architect, Founder and President of Centino Systems, Pluralsight Author, Corporate Problem Solver and a voracious student of the latest computer science technology. Anthony is only satisfied when he finds the right technology resolution for his client’s business need.  Business today thrives on data – from the C-Suite to the information worker.  Anthony specializes in all things related to data – database systems, virtualization, system and network design and performance engineering.  He designs solutions, deploys the technology and provides expertise on business system performance, architecture and security.    Anthony has a Masters in Computer Science and is working towards a PhD focusing on high performance/low latency data access algorithms on solid state disks.  Anthony is interested in engaging with anyone who strives to understand how data drives business decisions.  He seeks to work with technologists he can teach as he solves the bigger business problems faced by today’s enterprises.
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2 Comments. Leave new

Really small grammar/comma tweaks:

“PowerShell is now available on Linux and Mac, and you want to use it to manage your multi-platform data center.”

You want a comma between “Mac” and “and” because it’s two separate sentences chained together. Either one of those would stand on its own. If you can take out the conjunction without any other changes, and both of them work as sentences, then you need a comma.

“In this session, we will introduce the Open Source version, PowerShell Core, and learn why this is a big deal.”

Couple of commas added to the above.

“Then we’ll get into the essentials of using PowerShell on Linux and Mac. We’ll start with installation, work our way into using cmdlets and bash integration, building pipelines, heterogenous operating system remoting scenarios, and discuss Desired State Configuration.”

One of the commas needed to be a period, and I put in the Oxford comma before the and. This explains the Oxford comma pretty well:

https://www.grammarly.com/blog/what-is-the-oxford-comma-and-why-do-people-care-so-much-about-it/

Then stick a semicolon before your list, and then add a “so” or something after the comma here:

“Microsoft has embraced the Open Source community, so let’s learn how to manage multi-platform systems with PowerShell Core.”

Whew! Tons of grammar work in that one, heh.

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